Palmer Park, previously full of briar bushes and not much else, underwent some major changes in the early 20th century. In 1910, Carrollton Avenue was dug out by hand and paved; the excess mud was put onto carts and pulled by mules to the park where…

Sedgwick Hospital was one of many that existed in the area to service the military during and after the war. Greenville, located along the lower boundary (Lowerline Street) of Carrollton, formed from the former land of Pierre Foucher. The Foucher…

The signature attraction of the 1984 Louisiana World Exposition held in New Orleans was MART (Mississippi Aerial River Transit), a $12 million aerial gondola transport system that connected the fair site on the East Bank of the Mississippi River with…

When planning the 1984 Louisiana World Exposition (LWE), fair and city officials decided to build a monorail system. This project had two objectives. First, it was intended to move many visitors so as to limit traffic congestion in the Warehouse and…

The Prytania Streetcar began operation in 1861 as a mule-drawn car line. It was called the "Silk Stocking" line because its route included the streets of the "Garden District," an uptown area of the city developed in the 19th century by wealthy…

19th century New Orleanians knew Margaret (Gaffney) Haughery by several endearing terms. The "Bread Woman," "Friend of the Orphans," "Mother of the Orphans," "Our Margaret," and "Angel of the Delta" are the best known. Personal tragedies experienced…

Throughout the 1920s, Carrollton residents and New Orleans Public (NOPL) Library officials lobbied the city to build a facility in the Carrollton neighborhood. In 1928, the Council appropriated $20,000 for the purchase of a lot in the area, but…

Earliest ferry service from Carrollton across the Mississippi River to the West Bank area known as Nine Mile Point was operating by 1845. Rowers powered these skiff ferries. In the mid- and late 1800s, visitors to Carrollton could disembark the New…

The first bridge built across the Pontchartrain was the Watson-Williams Toll Bridge, also known as the Five-Mile Bridge and now the Maestri Bridge; the Louisiana Highway Commission approved its construction in 1925.

The site of New Orleans first appealed to the city's founder, Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville, in 1699. Native Americans had informed him about Bayou St. John, a shortcut from Lake Pontchartrain to the higher land on the banks of a defensible…

The second free bridge opened in 1930, ensuring the failure of the privately owned and managed Watson-Williams toll bridge. First as Public Service Commissioner and then as a gubernatorial candidate, Huey Long had won a great deal of support as a…

The Chef Menteur Pass Bridge offered free access to and from New Orleans, helping to make the Northshore of Lake Pontchartrain and the rest of the Gulf Coast more accessible to the city. Political candidate Huey Long was a vocal opponent to toll…

The neutral ground began to get its transformation with tracks being laid on Carrollton Avenue while the ten track streetcar barn one block off Carrollton Avenue surround by Dublin, Jeanette and Willow Street was constructed. The Berlin Iron Bridge…

Pre-Katrina, the area immediately in front of the east breaches of the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal (a.k.a. the Industrial Canal) was a dense, thriving neighborhood of primarily African American lower- to middle-class homeowners. Houses in this…