In 1963, sit-ins and boycotts on Canal Street and Dryades Street had been taking place for two years. African Americans were fighting for their Civil Rights both behind the counter and in front of the counter. This meant employment for African…

On February 14, 1957, New Orleans' New Zion Baptist Church hosted a meeting of local pastors. The Reverend Martin Luther, Jr. was in attendance, and by the end of the day, the Southern Leadership Conference (SLC) was formed. A precursor to the…

Segregation was widespread and remained deeply rooted in New Orleans in the early 1960s. Following the Woolworth's lunch counter demonstration in Greensboro, North Carolina, student-led, nonviolent direct action swept across the country. In 1960,…

The Knights of Peter Claver, Inc. is the largest historically African-American Catholic lay organization in the United States. The Claver Building as it is often called, was the headquarters of the New Orleans branch of the NAACP and was a pivotal…

During the 1950s and 60s, Dooky Chase’s Restaurant provided a safe space for national and local civil rights activist to meet and strategize over a bowl of Leah Chase’s famous Creole Gumbo. Beginning in 1939, as a sandwich shop and lottery outlet on…