The Ashé Cultural Arts Center was established in 1998 in a vacant former department store space. Ashé provides opportunities for visual art exhibitions and performances, education, community programs, and partnerships that lift up the work of…

Café Reconcile is known for great New Orleans food and a life-changing experience for both the customer and the trainees. Now in its 16th year, the restaurant operates an eight week on the job training program for young adults and places them in…

The Youth Empowerment Project (YEP), a community-based non-profit is clear about their vision: “Yep envisions a community where all people have access to the opportunities, skills, resources, and relationships they need to actualize their…

The Southern Food & Beverage Museum (SoFAB) is a non-profit that celebrates and educates visitors on the Southern culture of food and beverage. After years at the New Orleans Riverwalk development, SoFAB relocated to Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard in…

Each year, the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration in New Orleans includes a stop on Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard where a commemorative statue was erected in 1976. Artist Frank Hayden, a former student at Xavier University and professor at…

Once a public School, this 116-year-old building has received a complete award-winning historic renovation. It currently houses the Dryades Public Market, an art gallery, and office space. After the school was closed, the building stood vacant for…

Founded in 1989, The New Orleans Mission first started providing shelter, food, and religious guidance to a growing population of homeless men. Financially supported by donations from local residents, churches, organizations, and corporations, The…

William Faulkner was born in New Albany, Mississippi in 1897, and frequently used his familiar Southern surroundings as the setting for many of his works. Faulkner was an American novelist and poet that became well-known for his works that included…

The French Market is a notable location right at the edge of the French Quarter. The market was built in 1791 and has continued to be a historic and important location for the people of New Orleans. Throughout its years the market has changed with…

Enjoyed with a hot cup of New Orleans’ chicory coffee, the beignet, pronounced “bayne-yay”, is the official doughnut of Louisiana. True to an American migration story, the beignet’s journey to Louisiana has roots across the globe. From Rome…

 In the nineteenth century, the port of New Orleans grew from a colonial supply depot into the second largest port in the country and the fourth largest in the world during the 1840s. European explorers and traders dispersed the centuries-old…