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All Stories: 313

Michael Mizell-Nelson was a historian of the streetcar, exploring the labor history and publicizing the connection of streetcar strikes to the creation of the Po Boy Sandwich, examining streetcar segregation and integration, documenting the women…

At the intersection of Saint Charles Avenue and Howard Avenue stands a 12 foot tall statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee standing atop a column. The statue was the product of the Robert E. Lee Monumental Association, which formed in 1870 just…

Subjects: Civil War

On April 24, 1862, Union Flag Officer David Farragut successfully passed Forts Jackson and Saint Philip with a part of his naval squadron. His goal was to proceed to and take possession of New Orleans, cutting the two Confederate forts off from…

Subjects: Civil War

Following the US Civil War, many Confederate officials made their way to New Orleans to rebuild their lives. As government and military leaders reached old age, veterans organizations began to gather together to determine what to do with artifacts…

Subjects: Civil War

In the fall of 1861, the Confederate Navy was working to expand into a formidable organization. Secretary of the Navy Stephen Mallory was tasked with building a navy from nothing and his answer to the Union blockade was a proposed fleet of ironclad…

Subjects: Civil War

After President Abraham Lincoln declared a blockade of the Confederacy in April 1861, it took time to put into place. By late 1861 however, the blockade of the Mississippi River was in proper force and was moving to expand. Captain John Pope was in…

Subjects: Civil War

The secession of Louisiana brought about the realization that New Orleans and the Gulf Coast were not well protected. In the summer of 1861, military officials in New Orleans took steps to set up defenses of the Louisiana coast. Their first target…

Subjects: Civil War

After Flag Officer David Farragut successfully passed the Confederate fortifications at Forts Jackson and Saint Philip with part of his squadron on the morning of April 24, 1862, Confederate officials at the forts wondered what to do next. The…

Subjects: Civil War

In early 1862, military operations in Kentucky and Missouri were proving disastrous for the Confederacy and Confederate officials looked to the defenses of New Orleans to reinforce armies operating farther north. 5,000 soldiers were entrained for…

Subjects: Civil War

After Louisiana seceded in February 1861, the state began to organize defenses and military camps in its most populous cities. In New Orleans, several military camps emerged to serve as training grounds for newly enlisted soldiers. A site along the…

Subjects: Civil War

In August 1861, Harry Macarthy, also known as "The Arkansas Comedian," arrived in New Orleans to perform a three-month stint of "Personation Concerts" at the Academy of Music, that included singing, dancing, and impersonations. Macarthy debuted…

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