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All Stories: 324

At the intersection of Saint Charles Avenue and Howard Avenue stands a 12 foot tall statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee standing atop a column. The statue was the product of the Robert E. Lee Monumental Association, which formed in 1870 just…

Following the US Civil War, many Confederate officials made their way to New Orleans to rebuild their lives. As government and military leaders reached old age, veterans organizations began to gather together to determine what to do with artifacts…

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Subjects: Civil War

After President Abraham Lincoln declared a blockade of the Confederacy in April 1861, Confederate President Jefferson Davis responded by issuing a call for letters of marque and reprisal. Just as the United States had done in the Revolution and War…

Subjects: Civil War

In the fall of 1861, the Confederate Navy was working to expand into a formidable organization. Secretary of the Navy Stephen Mallory was tasked with building a navy from nothing and his answer to the Union blockade was a proposed fleet of ironclad…

Subjects: Civil War

After President Abraham Lincoln declared a blockade of the Confederacy in April 1861, it took time to put into place. By late 1861 however, the blockade of the Mississippi River was in proper force and was moving to expand. Captain John Pope was in…

After Flag Officer David Farragut successfully passed the Confederate fortifications at Forts Jackson and Saint Philip with part of his squadron on the morning of April 24, 1862, Confederate officials at the forts wondered what to do next. The…

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Subjects: Civil War

In early 1862, military operations in Kentucky and Missouri were proving disastrous for the Confederacy and Confederate officials looked to the defenses of New Orleans to reinforce armies operating farther north. 5,000 soldiers were entrained for…

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Subjects: Civil War

After Louisiana seceded in February 1861, the state began to organize defenses and military camps in its most populous cities. In New Orleans, several military camps emerged to serve as training grounds for newly enlisted soldiers. A site along the…

Gallatin Street was not only home to criminals and prostitutes, but also provided a venue for many of New Orleans’ musicians. This Times-Picayune article sets the scene of a typical Gallatin Street dancehall: “Another blast on the horn, a strum…

In 1924, Times-Picayune journalist Lyle Saxon provided a description of Gallatin Street as it appeared in the 1920s, calling it “deserted, forgotten, given over to warehouses and storage rooms of produce merchants. It is permeated with the smells…

Gallatin Street was once filled with barrooms, dance houses, and brothels — most institutions serving as all three. There was rarely a fee to enter, but men were encouraged to buy a drink for their dance partner at the end of each dance, keeping…

Gallatin Street’s close proximity to the port made it a quick and frequent stop for those who docked, worked, or lived near the booming economic area. One observer purported that the second most profitable industry in New Orleans also thrived in…

Gallatin Street: "the place where Terpsichore and Bacchus ruled the hour." A small, two-block stretch called Gallatin Street, now called French Market Place, was once the headquarters of vice in New Orleans. A visitor to the street in 1873…

In August 1861, Harry Macarthy, also known as "The Arkansas Comedian," arrived in New Orleans to perform a three-month stint of "Personation Concerts" at the Academy of Music, that included singing, dancing, and impersonations. Macarthy debuted…

The popularity of sheet music in the United States had reached its peak by the start of the Civil War. Well before the development of recording and broadcasting technology, the commercial music industry centered upon the circulation of sheet music…

The Louisiana Supreme Court decided one of the famous “Batture Cases” while located in the Government House. In Morgan v. Livingston, the Louisiana Supreme Court held that the owner of “rural” land fronting the Mississippi River owned the…

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